Selected Plants of Navajo Rangelands

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Four o'clock
K’ińeeshdlíshiidą́ą́’łigai
(a.k.a. trailing windmills, guapile)

Allionia incarnata var. incarnata's bright pink blossoms and distinctive foliage with wavy leaf margins.

Four o'clock is a prostrate perennial herb which is glandularly pubescent. The flowers are pink and notched. The leaves are wedge shaped. The three flowers of four o'clock in each whorl all flower at the same time and are very close together, giving the illusion of one large completely symmetrical flower. Actually, the three flowers are each individually bilaterally symmetrical. The complicated fruit of four o'clock has two incurved wings that are frequently triangularly toothed, and it has two rows of glands on its surface. Four o'clock is found in low, dry, rocky areas.

*Description courtesy of Western New Mexico University's Vascular Plants of the Gila Wilderness.

Low growth habit of Allionia incarnata var. incarnata
Bright pink blossom displaying distinctive structure of Allionia incarnata var. incarnata. The flower is actually three flowers that are fused together in a single structure.
Small, yellow, immature fruits of Allionia incarnata var. incarnata
An unusually pale floral specimen of Allionia incarnata var. villosa
Growth habit of Allionia incarnata var. villosa
Bright pink "flower" of Allionia incarnata var. villosa. Like the other variety of this species, it has three flowers fused into a single structure that looks like one flower.

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